Webinar Archives

This webinar originally aired on: 03 November 2016

This webinar will be presented by Louis Botsford of the University of California, Davis.

The state of California established a statewide network of marine protected areas through the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) process. Managers and scientists must now figure out how to employ adaptive management of these MPAs (i.e., to compare outcomes to predicted effects, a requirement of the act). The first step was to initiate baseline monitoring of sites inside the new MPAs and at select reference sites outside of them. Next, with support from California Sea Grant, researchers developed computer models for adaptive management of Central California's MPAs for commercially and recreationally important species such as blue rockfish, black rockfish, lingcod, and cabezon. The spatial population models incorporated what is known about species' larval dispersals, adult movement patterns, and key species interactions to simulate how fish populations might respond to spatial closures and other factors, such as fishing pressure outside the no-fishing zones. Output from the simulations has provided insights on how soon managers should expect to see increases in fish population abundances and when and why there may be time lags in some species’ responses, given factors such as pre-MPA fishing pressure and pre-MPA fish population abundance. The models also offer predictions for how much individual fish sizes might be expected to increase over time. Yet other computational modeling focused on determining "spill-over" distances for MPAs and their implications for siting monitoring reference sites. The scientists report that simply comparing sites inside and outside MPAs can produce misleading results and that consistent evaluation of each over time is more important for accurate assessments of MPA performance than comparing inside and outside MPAs at a set time. This group is working collaboratively with state wildlife managers to develop the science necessary to monitor and adaptively manage the state’s new MPAs.

Webinar co-sponsored by the NOAA National MPA Center, MPA News, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

This webinar originally aired on: 29 September 2016

This webinar was presented by Souha EL ASMI, Programme Officer at the Regional Activity Centre for Specially Protected Areas (RAC/SPA – UNEP/MAP).

Advancing marine conservation, particularly through Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) has been an important priority agenda in the Mediterranean, particularly for the past two decades. The Barcelona Convention in particular played a convening role and an important umbrella for a multitude of MPA initiatives in the region, with several actors increasing their efforts to support the achievement of the global 2012 MPA target and the subsequent Aichi Target. In this regard, its Contracting Parties have adopted in 2009 a “Regional Working Programme for the Coastal and Marine Protected Areas in the Mediterranean Sea including the High Sea”, and in 2016 a “Roadmap for a Comprehensive Coherent network of Well-Managed MPAs to Achieve Aichi Target 11 in the Mediterranean”.

The webinar will introduce these regional strategies and tools and highlight the efforts made in terms of marine and coastal protected areas establishment and management in the Mediterranean region.

This webinar originally aired on: 27 September 2016

This webinar was presented by Giuseppe di Carlo of WWF.

The webinar will address the current situation of Marine Protected Areas in the Mediterranean, including challenges and opportunities. WWF has been supporting a number of Mediterranean MPAs in advancing towards effective management, coherent planning and capacity building for staff. WWF also founded MedPAN, the regional MPA network that today counts 100 members and partners from 18 countries. The webinar will present the complexity of the MPA system in the Mediterranean, highlight success stories and define immediate needs to achieve Aichi Target 11. 

Webinar co-sponsored by the Mare Nostrum Network, MPA News, OpenChannels.org, and the EBM Tools Network (co-coordinated by NatureServe and OpenChannels.org).

This webinar originally aired on: 07 February 2013

The Commission for Environmental Cooperation an interactive webcast with Washington Post national environment reporter Juliet Eilperin and Maria Brown, superintendent of the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary to discuss how North America's marine protected areas can address challenges posed by a changing climate.

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